Rosaceae

یکشنبه 26 شهریور 1391 07:18 ب.ظ

نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی


  Families of Dicotyledons



837 IMAGES FOUND: IMAGES 1 - 80:


Acaena cylindristachya

Acaena cylindristachya

Acaena cylindristachya

Acaena cylindrostachya

Acaena novae-zealandiae

Adenostoma fasciculatum

Adenostoma fasciculatum

Adenostoma fasciculatum

Adenostoma fasciculatum

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia eupatoria

Agrimonia pubescens

Agrimonia pubescens

Agrimonia pubescens

Agrimonia pubescens

Alchemilla faeroensis

Alchemilla faeroensis

Alchemilla mollis

Alchemilla mollis

Alchemilla mollis

Alchemilla mollis

Amelanchier

Amelanchier

Amelanchier

Amelanchier canadensis

Amelanchier denticulata

Amelanchier denticulata

Amelanchier denticulata

Amelanchier denticulata

Amelanchier denticulata

Amelanchier denticulata

Amelanchier denticulata

Amelanchier denticulata

Amelanchier laevis

Amelanchier laevis

Amelanchier laevis

Amelanchier laevis

Amelanchier laevis

Amelanchier laevis

Amelanchier ovalis

Amelanchier ovalis

Amelanchier ovalis

Amelanchier ovalis

Aronia arbutifolia

Aronia arbutifolia

Aronia arbutifolia

Aruncus aethusifolius

Aruncus dioicus

Aruncus dioicus

Aruncus dioicus

Bencomia caudata

Bencomia caudata

Bencomia caudata

Bencomia caudata

Bencomia caudata

Bencomia caudata

Cercocarpus betuloides

Cercocarpus betuloides

Cercocarpus betuloides

Cercocarpus montanus

Cercocarpus montanus

Cercocarpus montanus

Cercocarpus montanus

Chaenomeles

Chaenomeles speciosa

Chaenomeles speciosa

Chaenomeles speciosa

Chaenomeles speciosa

Chaenomeles speciosa



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System of Classification

یکشنبه 26 شهریور 1391 06:56 ب.ظ

نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی

System of Classification*

Aceraceae, Acoraceae, Adoxaceae, Agavaceae, Aizoaceae, Alismataceae, Alliaceae, Amaranthaceae, Amaryllidaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Aponogetonaceae, Aquifoliaceae, Araceae, Araliaceae, Arecaceae, Aristolochiaceae, Asclepiadaceae, Asphodelaceae, Asteraceae, Balsaminaceae, Begoniaceae, Berberidaceae, Betulaceae, Boraginaceae, Brassicaceae, Butomaceae, Buxaceae, Calycanthaceae, Cactaceae, Campanulaceae, Cannabinaceae, Cannaceae, Caprifoliaceae, Capparaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Celtidaceae, Cercidiphyllaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Cleomaceae, Clethraceae, Colchicaceae, Commelinaceae, Convallariaceae, Convolvulaceae, Cornaceae, Crassulaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Cupressaceae, Cyperaceae, Dioscoreaceae, Dipsaccaceae, Dracaenaceae, Ebenaceae, Equisetaceae, Ericaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Fagaceae, Flacourtiaceae, Fumariaceae, Gentianaceae, Geraniaceae, Ginkgoaceae, Haloragaceae , Hamamelidaceae, Hemerocallidaceae, Hippocastanaceae, Hyacinthaceae, Hydrangeaceae, Iridaceae, Juncaceae, Lamiaceae, Lardizabalaceae, Lauraceae, Liliaceae, Linaceae, Linnaeaceae, Lobeliaceae, Lythraceae, Magnoliaceae, Malvaceae, Marantaceae, Marsileaceae, Moraceae, Musaceae, Nelumbonaceae, Nyctaginaceae, Nymphaeaceae, Nyssaceae, Oleaceae, Onagraceae, Oxalidaceae, Paeoniaceae, Papaveraceae, Passifloraceae, Phytolaccaceae, Pinaceae, Piperaceae, Plantaginaceae, Platanaceae, Plumbaginaceae, Poaceae, Polemoniaceae, Polygonaceae, Polygonataceae, Pontederiaceae, Portulacaceae, Potamogetonaceae, Primulaceae, Punicaceae, Ranunculaceae, Resedaceae, Rhamnaceae, Rosaceae, Rubiaceae, Ruscaceae, Rutaceae, Salicaceae, Sansevieraceae, Sapindaceae, Saururaceae, Saxifragaceae, Schisandraceae, Scrophulariaceae, Smilaceae, Solanaceae, Sparganiaceae, Styracaceae, Taxaceae, Taxodiaceae, Tetragoniaceae, Theaceae, Tiliaceae, Tropaeolaceae, Typhaceae, Ulmaceae, Urticaceae, Uvulariaceae,Valerianaceae, Verbenaceae, Veronicaceae, Violaceae, Vitaceae, Xanthorhoeaceae, Zingiberaceae

* Base on the APGII system of plant classification, some families are grouped together as one family.




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Juglandaceae 2

یکشنبه 26 شهریور 1391 06:44 ب.ظ

نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی


 


YYPG SYNONYMS:
Engelhardtiaceae, Platycaryaceae


Walnut Family


Juglandaceae found in keys:
Families of Dicotyledons

TAMU Image Gallery Gerald Carr images GOOGLE


156 IMAGES FOUND: IMAGES 1 - 80:

Alfaroa costaricensis

Alfaroa costaricensis

Carya

Carya

Carya

Carya

Carya

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis

Carya glabra

Carya glabra

Carya illinoensis

Carya illinoensis

Carya illinoensis

Carya illinoensis

Carya illinoensis

Carya illinoensis

Carya illinoensis

Carya illinoensis

Carya illinoensis

Carya laneyi

Carya laneyi

Carya ovata

Carya ovata

Carya ovata

Carya ovata

Carya ovata

Carya ovata

Carya ovata

Carya ovata

Carya ovata

Carya tomentosa

Cyclocarya paliurus

Cyclocarya paliurus

Cyclocarya paliurus

Cyclocarya paliurus

Cyclocarya paliurus

Cyclocarya paliurus

Cyclocarya paliurus

Cyclocarya paliurus

Cyclocarya paliurus

Cyclocarya paliurus

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans ailantifolia

Juglans californica



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Juglandaceae

یکشنبه 26 شهریور 1391 06:37 ب.ظ

نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی

Classification




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Fruit Terminology

یکشنبه 26 شهریور 1391 06:26 ب.ظ

نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی

Fruit Terminology Part 1

A. General Fruit Terminology

Carpel: Leaf-like megasporophyll bearing one or more ovules on the inner surface. In dehiscent dry fruits that split open, carpels are represented by the seed-bearing sections. Carpels are difficult to distinguish in dry, indehiscent fruits (e.g. nuts) and fleshy fruits (e.g. berries). Carpels are the innermost parts of a complete flower and they are united to form the gynoecium (pistil).


B. Dehiscent Dry Fruits (Split Open At Maturity)

1. Legume or Pod: Composed of one carpel.
Note: Some legumes are indehiscent and do not split open.

A legume (such as a bean pod) is composed a one folded carpel. It splits lengthwise along two seams into two sections, each of which represents half of a carpel. Some legume pods, such as carob and mesquite, are indehiscent and do not split open.

The peanut (Arachis hypogea) is a dehiscent legume that is harvested from below the soil. The legume was originally formed above ground following pollination. After fertilization, the flower stalk of the peanut curves downward, and the developing pod is forced into the ground by the proliferation and elongation of cells under the ovary. The pod typically contains two seeds, each with a papery seed coat. Peanut seeds are eaten raw, salted and roasted. Peanuts are ground into peanut butter and Thai peanut sauce, and the expressed oil is used in cooking. Peanuts are also used in cookies, peanut brittle and candy bars.

See Indehiscent Pods Of Carob Tree
A Peanut Plant With Subterranean Pod
Assorted Legumes Used For Vegetables


Note: Some legume fruits are indehiscent, including the carob tree, mesquite and honey locust. In addition, some legume fruits are oblong, rounded, kidney-shaped (reniform), or coiled (spiral-shaped), such as sweet clover (Melilotus alba and M. officinalis), black medic (Medicago lupulina), bur clover (M. polymorpha) and alfalfa (M. sativa). Some specialized legume fruits (called loments) break apart into indehiscent, seed-bearing segments. A good example of a loment is the fruit of crown vetch (Coronilla varia), a European wildflower that is naturalized throughout parts of North America. The slender pods are constricted between the seed-bearing segments.

Crown vetch (Coronilla varia) from Palomar Mountain in San Diego County, California. Note the slender legume fruit (called a loment) with constrictions between the seed-bearing segments. The fruit breaks apart transversely into seed-bearing sections. This attractive European wildflower has become a troublesome weed in parts of North America. It has been planted on road cuts for erosion control, but is a very invasive perennial with creeping rhizomes and prolific seed production.

Stick-tights or beggar's-ticks (Desmodium cuspidatum) produces slender loments that break into small, one-seeded joints covered with tiny barbed hairs. The individual joints are so flat that they are exceedingly difficult to remove from your socks. Like little flat ticks, you must individually pull off each one. This can be exasperating when your socks are covered with them. Several species of this remarkable hitchhiking herb are native to the midwestern and eastern United States.

The Wayne's Word Top 17 Hitchkiking Plants
The Classification Of Major Types Of Fruits


2. Capsule: Composed of several fused carpels.

The separate carpels of a true capsule were originally fused together to form the pistil or gynoecium. They separate along the septa or along the locules between septa.

Four methods of dehiscence in capsules: The carpels may separate along the septa or along the locules between the septa. Some capsules dehisce by a lid that falls off exposing the seeds. Poppies of the genus Papaver, including the opium poppy (P. somniferum), dehisce by small apical pores near the top of the capsule. As the capsule moves back and forth in the wind, the seeds are released like a pepper shaker.

Capsule Cluster Of Liquidambar Tree
See Circumscissile Capsule Of Purslane
See Exploding Capsules Of Witch Hazel
See Article About Mexican Jumping Beans
Devil's Claws: Amazing Hitchhiking Capsules
Opium Poppy Capsule: Source Of Raw Opium

It sould be noted here that some capsules are indehiscent. Their carpels do not separate and release the seeds. Two examples of plants with indehiscent capsules are the South African baobab tree (Adansonia digitata) and two species of South African gardenias (Gardenia thunbergii and G. volkensii). The seed pods of South African gardenias are chewed opened by large herbivores, and the seeds are dispersed in their feces.

Indehiscent capsule of the baobab tree (Adansonia digitata). Left: A dry fruit showing the velvety outer exocarp. Right: Longitudinal section of a dry fruit showing the large, angular seeds. Each seed is embedded in a white pulp which has a pleasant tart flavor. The lower left seed has been removed from the pulp. The common names of "cream-of-tarter tree" and "lemonade tree" are derivied from the powdered pulp which is mixed which water to make a refreshing drink. Baboons tear open the fruits to eat this tasty pulp.

Indehiscent Capsules of South African Gardenias
See Photo Of A South African Baobab Tree


3. Follicle: One carpel that splits along one seam.

The single carpel of a follicle splits open along one seam. When completely opened, the carpel resembles a thick, dried leaf. It is easy to see that the single carpel of a follicle is a modified, seed-bearing leaf (megasporophyll).

Parachute Seeds Of The Milkweed
Follicles Of Scarlet Larkspur & Peony
Follicle Of The Indian Almond (Sterculia)
Follicles Of The Primitive Magnolia Family


4. Silique: Two carpels separated by a seed-bearing septum.

The silique is an elongate fruit composed of two carpels separated by a seed-bearing partition. The silicle is very similar except it is much shorter (less than twice as long as broad). Siliques and silicles have parietal placentation. They are the characteristic fruits of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Some members of the mustard family have siliques that do not split longitudinally into two separate carpels. For example, fruits of the radish (Raphanus sativus) split transversely into seed-bearing sections (joints).

The overlapping seeds of bitter cress (Cardamine) are connected to alternate edges of the septum within each locule. The minute seeds are attached to both margins of the central septum. This revelation requires the skillful use of a dissecting microscope. In the Jepson Flora of California (1993), this genus keys out under "one row of seeds in each locule," without mentioning the alternating seed attachments along both edges of the septum. Apparently, the superficial appearance of the overlapping seeds in a single file is the defining character for the key.

A species of bitter cress (Cardamine) collected along the damp seepage area of a lawn in northern San Diego County. It is an annual with a fibrous root system (without rhizomes). The leafy stems are erect or ascending (curving upward from the base). The leaves are odd pinnate with 2 or three pairs of leaflets. This species of bitter cress greatly resembles the European annual C. flexuosa With. Another native species reported for San Diego County (C. oligosperma Torrey & A. Gray) has similar compound leaves; however, it has a distinct basal leaf rosette that is lacking in this species. It is interesting to note that C. flexuosa With. has now been added to the San Diego Natural History Museum on-line Checklist of Vascular Plants of San Diego County.

The seeds of water cress (Rorippa nasturtium-aquaticum) are connected along both margins of the septum within each locule. In the Jepson Flora of California (1993), this species keys out under "two rows of seeds in each locule." Although Cardamine also has seeds attached in two rows, the seeds are overlapping and do not appear distinctly 2-ranked. In Rorippa the seeds appear more distinctly two-ranked, and this is apparently a defining character for the key.

Inflorescence (raceme) of shepherd's-purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris), a common European annual that is naturalized in southern California. The silicles are inverted heart-shaped (obcordate). The membranous partitions remain on the pedicels long after the valves of the silicles have fallen away.

Moonwort (Lunaria annua), a European annual or biennial naturalized in California. The fruits of this species are called silicles because they are broad compared with the elongate and slender siliques. Generally silicles are only twice as long as broad (or less). The septum of each silicle remains attached to the dried flower stalk, long after the valves and seeds have fallen away



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Anacardiaceae

یکشنبه 26 شهریور 1391 06:18 ب.ظ

نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی

The Sumac Family :Anacardiaceae

Images Of Plants In This Fascinating Family

  1. Cashew (Anacardium occidentale)
  2. Hog Plum (Spondias mombin)
  3. Kaffir Plum (Harpephyllum caffrum)
  4. Mango (Mangifera indica)
  5. Pistachio Nut (Pistacia vera)
  6. Chinese Pistachio (Pistacia chinensis)
  7. Gum Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus)
  8. South American Pepper Trees
  9. Basket Bush & Smooth Sumac
  10. Lemonade Berry (Rhus integrifolia)
  11. Sugar Bush (Rhus ovata)
  12. Laurel Sumac (Rhus laurina)
  13. Elephant Tree #1 (Pachycormus discolor)
  14. Elephant Tree #2 (Operculicarya decaryi)
  15. Burdekin Plum (Pleiogynium solandri)
  16. Poison Oak and Ivy (Toxicodendron



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Plant Classification

یکشنبه 26 شهریور 1391 05:51 ب.ظ

نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی

 

The plant kingdom is very diverse. Plants can be vascular or non-vascular. Non vascular plants in mosses (byrophta), hornworts (anthocerphyta) and liverworts (hepaticophta). These plants tend to be low to the ground and live in wetter areas. The vascular plants have phoelom and xylem. Phoelom and xylem allow vascular plants to live away from water. The vascular plants can be have seeds. The ferns (pteriphyta) reproduce by spores and don't use seeds for reproduction. Plants that reproduce by seed can have naked seeds (gymnosperms) or covered seeds (angiosperms). The gymnosperms include conifers (coniferophyta), cycads (cycadophyta), ginko trees (ginkophyta), or gnetophyta. Conifers include evergreens and are more hardy than deciduous trees. Cycads live in tropical areas and tend to be toxic. Ginko trees are are a very resilient and have no natural predators. Gnetophyta are strange plants. This is where all the plants that are not quite understood are put. Everyone is familiar with angiosperms. They tend to be the dominant plant in most areas. They form the pretty flowers you see or fruits like apples or watermelon. Angiosperms can be monocots (liliopsida) or eudicots. A well known monocot is sweet corn.
Phylogenic Tree of Plants made by myself




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Flowering Plants

یکشنبه 26 شهریور 1391 05:47 ب.ظ

نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی

  • Buttercup Buttercup


  • Lauraceae Family

  • Papaveraceae Family

  • Brassicaceae Family
  • Rosaceae Family:
  • Fabaceae Family:
  • Euphorbiaceae Family:
  • Cactaceae Family:
  • Lamiaceae Family:
  • Solanaceae Family
  • Apiaceae Family
  • Cucurbitaceae Family
  • Asteraceae Family
  • Poaceae Family
  • Liliaceae Family
  • Orchidaceae Family
  • Assignments
  • Glossary



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    Lamiaceae

    یکشنبه 26 شهریور 1391 05:40 ب.ظ

    نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی

    Lamiaceae - Mint Family
    Contents English Names Index

    Lamiaceae, the Mint family, consists of about 200 genera and 3,200 species worldwide, mostly perennial or annual herbs and shrubs (rarely trees). They are usually easily recognizable by having square stems and opposite or whorled leaves. Many of the species are aromatic, making them further recognizable. Lamiaceae (formerly Labiatae) receives a lot of interest, as many members of the family possess high economic and other useful qualities. These plants characteristically bear essential oils in the form of their crushed foliage. Despite their identifiable qualities, they are a family of great diversity and variety.
    The flowers of Lamiaceae are bilaterally symmetrical, have 5 united sepals, 5 united petals, usually arranged so as to form an upper and often lower lip, stamens are 2 to 4. All these parts attached at the base of the ovary. The flowers grow in long clusters, heads, or interrupted whorls on the stem.
    The leaves vary from simple (typical in our area) to pinnately or palmately dissected or compound, are either opposite or whorled (3 – 10 per whorl) and are usually toothed. They are almost always aromatic (very rarely lacking an odor). The leaves are either one–veined, pinnately veined, or palmately veined, and either heart shaped (or close to it) or rounded at the base. As explained above, the stems of this family have a unique square (4-sided) shape about them. The fruit has 4 lobes, each forming a hard, single-seeded nutlet, rarely a stone.

    Guide to Identify Presented Species of the Mint Family
    FLOWERS GROWING IN DENSE CLUSTERS ON STEM TOPS
    Mentha spicata - Spearmint
    Stems single, erect, 30-100 cm tall. Ditches and streambanks.
    Flowers whitish, 2-4 mm long, tubular, 4-lobed, clustered in dense, tall spikes.
    Leaves opposite, broadly lance-shaped, sharp-toothed, pointed, 2-7 cm long.
    Monarda fistulosa - Wild Bergamot
    Stems single, 30-70 cm tall, with minty odor. Moderately dry, open sites.
    Flowers pink-purple, tubular, 2-3 cm long, in dense clusters above leafy bracts.
    Leaves opposite, broadly lanceolate, sharp-toothed, short-stalked, 2.5-8 cm long.
    Nepeta cataria - Catnip
    Stems branched, 30-100 cm tall, short-grey-hairy. Meadows, roadsides.
    Flowers white with small purple dots, 10-15 mm long, in dense, tall clusters.
    Leaves opposite, coarsely toothed, stalked, heart-shaped, 2.5-7 cm long.
    Prunella vulgaris - Self-Heal
    Soft-hairy low plant, 5-30 cm tall. Moist, open to shaded sites, plains-montane.
    Flowers purple, tubular, 1-2 cm long, with a hooded upper lip, in short spikes.
    Leaves opposite, in few pairs, lance- to egg-shaped, entire, stalked, 2-9 cm long.
    FLOWERS SMALL, DENSELY CLUSTERED, GROWING FROM UPPER LEAF AXILS
    Marrubium vulgare - Horehound
    Plant 30-100 cm tall. Casual weed along roadsides and disturbed habitats.
    Flowers whitish, about 6 mm long, in dense, round clusters from upper leaf axils.
    Leaves opposite, thick, rounded, toothed and coarsely wrinkled, 20-55 mm long.
    Mentha arvensis - Wild Mint
    Aromatic, glandular-dotted plant, 20-80 cm tall. Moist to wet sites.
    Flowers pink-white, 4-7 mm long, 4-lobed, in dense clusters from upper leaf axils.
    Leaves opposite, 2-8 cm long, lance-shaped, sharp-toothed, mostly stalkless.
    FLOWERS FEWER, GROWING SEPARATELY FROM UPPER LEAF AXILS
    Lamium amplexicaule - Henbit Dead-Nettle
    Slender annual, 5-15 cm tall, with creeping base. Weed in disturbed areas.
    Flowers pink-purple, 12-18 mm long, hooded, 2-lipped, from upper leaf axils.
    Leaves opposite, rounded, coarsely round-toothed, about 1.5 cm long.
    Alphabetical listing with links to presented species of the the Mint family:
    Scientific Name English Name Swedish Name

    Lamium
    Marrubium
    Mentha
    Monarda
    Nepeta
    Prunella
    Dead-Nettle
    Horehound
    Mint
    Bergamot
    Catnip
    Self-Heal
    Plistrar
    Kransborrar
    Myntor
    -
    -
    Nepetor
    Brunörter



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    The Plant List

    شنبه 25 شهریور 1391 06:40 ب.ظ

    نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی

    The Plant List — A working list for all plant species

    Search

    Enter a Genus (eg Ocimum) or genus and species (eg Ocimum basilicum).

    ? will match a single character. * will match any number of characters. Use at least three letters in the genus name if you include a ? or *.

    The Plant List is a working list of all known plant species. Version 1 aims to be comprehensive for species of Vascular plant (flowering plants, conifers, ferns and their allies) and of Bryophytes (mosses and liverworts).

    Collaboration between the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Missouri Botanical Garden enabled the creation of The Plant List by combining multiple checklist data sets held by these institutions and other collaborators.

    The Plant List provides the Accepted Latin name for most species, with links to all Synonyms by which that species has been known. It also includes Unresolved names for which the contributing data sources did not contain sufficient evidence to decide whether they were Accepted or Synonyms.

    Summary Statistics

    The Plant List includes 1,040,426 scientific plant names of species rank. Of these 298,900 are accepted species names.

    The Plant List contains 620 plant families and 16,167 plant genera.

    The status of the 1,040,426 species names, are as follows:

    StatusTotal
    Accepted298,90028.7%
    Synonym477,60145.9%
    Unresolved263,92525.4%

    Browse

    Click on the major plant group of interest to explore the taxonomic hierarchy embedded within The Plant List.

    Work down the taxonomic hierarchy from Major Group (to find out which Families belong to each), to Family (to discover the Genera belonging to each) and finally Genus (to list the Species in each).




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    Cactaceae- Taxonomic information

    یکشنبه 19 شهریور 1391 11:06 ق.ظ

    نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی
          

                       

          
    KingdomPlantae – plantes, Planta, Vegetal, plants
    SubkingdomViridaeplantae – green plants
    InfrakingdomStreptophyta – land plants
    DivisionTracheophyta – vascular plants, tracheophytes
    SubdivisionSpermatophytina – spermatophytes, seed plants, phanérogames
    InfradivisionAngiospermae – flowering plants, angiosperms, plantas com flor, angiosperma, plantes à fleurs, angiospermes, plantes à fruits
    ClassMagnoliopsida
    SuperorderCaryophyllanae
    OrderCaryophyllales
    FamilyCactaceae – cactus
    Direct Children:
    GenusAcanthocereus (Engelm. ex Berger) Britt. & Rose – triangle cactus
    GenusAncistrocactus
    GenusAriocarpus Scheidw. – livingrock
    GenusAstrophytum Lem. – astrophytum
    GenusBergerocactus Britt. & Rose – snakecactus
    GenusCarnegia Britt. & Rose – carnegia cactus, saguaro
    GenusCarnegiea Britton & Rose – saguaro
    GenusCephalocereus Pfeiff.
    GenusCereus P. Mill. – sweetpotato cactus
    GenusCoryphantha (Engelm.) Lem. – coryphantha, beehive cactus, coryphantha cactus
    GenusEchinocactus Link & Otto – echinocactus, barrel cactus
    GenusEchinocereus Engelm. – hedgehog cactus
    GenusEpiphyllum Haw. – climbing cactus
    GenusEpithelantha A. Weber ex Britt. & Rose – epithelantha, pingpong ball cactus
    GenusEscobaria Britt. & Rose – foxtail cactus, pincushion cactus
    GenusFerocactus Britt. & Rose – ferocactus, barrel cactus
    GenusHarrisia Britt. – applecactus
    GenusHyalocereus
    GenusHylocereus (Berger) Britt. & Rose – nightblooming cactus
    GenusLemaireocereus
    GenusLeptocereus (Berger) Britt. & Rose – leptocereus
    GenusLophophora Coult. – lophophora
    GenusMammillaria Haw. – pincushion cactus, globe cactus, fishhook cactus
    GenusMelocactus Link & Otto – melocactus
    GenusNeolloydia Britt. & Rose – neolloydia
    GenusOpuntia P. Mill. – figues de Barbarie, pricklypear, pricklypear and cholla, cactus spp., Prickly pear, prickly pear species
    GenusPachycereus (Berger) Britt. & Rose – pachycereus
    GenusPediocactus Britt. & Rose – hedgehog cactus
    GenusPeniocereus (Berger) Britt. & Rose – peniocereus
    GenusPereskia P. Mill. – pereskia
    GenusPilosocereus Byles & Rowley – tree cactus
    GenusRhipsalis Gaertn. – rhipsalis
    GenusSchlumbergera Lem. – schlumbergera
    GenusSclerocactus Britt. & Rose – fishhook cactus
    GenusSelenicereus (Berger) Britt. & Rose – moonlight cactus
    GenusStenocereus (Berger) Riccob. – stenocereus
    GenusThelocactus (K. Schum.) Britt. & Rose – thelocactus
    GenusTurbinicarpus Buxbaum & Backeberg – top cactus



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    Family Cactaceae

    یکشنبه 19 شهریور 1391 10:54 ق.ظ

    نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی
    Family Cactaceae
    Acanthocalycium
    Acanthocereus
    Acharagma
    Ancistrocactus
    Ariocarpus
    Armatocereus
    Arrojadoa
    Arthrocereus
    Astrophytum
    Austrocactus
    Austrocylindropuntia
    Aztekium
    Bergerocactus
    Blossfeldia
    Brachycereus
    Brasilicereus
    Brasiliopuntia
    Browningia
    Calymmanthium
    Carnegiea
    Cephalocereus
    Cereus
    Cintia
    Cipocereus
    Cleistocactus
    Cochemiea
    Coleocephalocereus
    Consolea
    Copiapoa
    Corryocactus
    Corynopuntia
    Coryphantha
    Cumulopuntia
    Cylindropuntia
    Dendrocereus
    Denmoza
    Discocactus
    Disocactus
    Echinocactus
    Echinocereus
    Echinomastus
    Echinopsis
    Epiphyllum
    Epithelantha
    Eriosyce
    Escobaria
    Escontria
    Espostoa
    Espostoopsis
    Eulychnia
    Facheiroa
    Ferocactus
    Frailea
    Geohintonia
    Grusonia
    Gymnocalycium
    Haageocereus
    Harrisia
    Hatiora
    Hylocereus
    Isolatocereus
    Jasminocereus
    Lasiocereus
    Leocereus
    Lepismium
    Leptocereus
    Leuchtenbergia
    Lophophora
    Maihuenia
    Maihueniopsis
    Mammillaria
    Mammilloydia
    Matucana
    Melocactus
    Micranthocereus
    Micropuntia
    Mila
    Miqueliopuntia
    Myrtillocactus
    Neobuxbaumia
    Neolloydia
    Neoraimondia
    Neowerdermannia
    Notocactus
    Obregonia
    Opuntia
    Oreocereus
    Oroya
    Ortegocactus
    Pachycereus
    Parodia
    Pediocactus
    Pelecyphora
    Peniocereus
    Pereskia
    Pereskiopsis
    Pierrebraunia
    Pilosocereus
    Polaskia
    Praecereus
    Pseudoacanthocereus
    Pseudorhipsalis
    Pterocactus
    Pygmaeocereus
    Quiabentia
    Rauhocereus
    Rebutia
    Rhipsalis
    Samaipaticereus
    Schlumbergera
    Sclerocactus
    Selenicereus
    Stenocactus
    Stenocereus
    Stephanocereus
    Stetsonia
    Strombocactus
    Sulcorebutia
    Tacinga
    Tephrocactus
    Thelocactus
    Tunilla
    Turbinicarpus
    Uebelmannia
    Weberbauerocereus
    Weberocereus
    xPacherocactus
    Yavia
    Yungasocereus



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    Plant adaptations

    یکشنبه 19 شهریور 1391 10:39 ق.ظ

    نویسنده : عسکر اله قلی

    Plants have adaptations to help them survive (live and grow) in different areas. Adaptations are special features that allow a plant or animal to live in a particular place or habitat. These adaptations might make it very difficult for the plant to survive in a different place. This explains why certain plants are found in one area, but not in another. For example, you wouldn't see a cactus living in the Arctic. Nor would you see lots of really tall trees living in grasslands.

    Click on the different biomes or areas below to learn about them and some of the adaptations plants have to live there:

    Desert
    Desert
    Grassland
    Grassland
    Tropical Rain Forest
    Tropical Rain Forest
    Temperate Rain Forest
    Temperate Rain Forest
    Temperate Deciduous Forest
    Temperate Deciduous Forest
    Taiga
    Taiga
    Tundra
    Tundra
    In Water
    In Water



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